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Book 36: Very British Problems: Making Life Awkward For Ourselves, One Rainy Day at a Time by Rob Temple.

I am always pretty sceptical when I come across social media spin-off books, and although I have bought a few, I make a point of only buying them second hand, because I tend to just read them and then dispose of them.

This one is based on a popular Twitter account and contains a previously tweeted collection of problems that the author considers to be very British, although as a non-Brit I have to say that some of them are just very human. It's one of four books in a series, which just shows how popular the Twitter is. 

Much like another Twitter spin-off book (two books, actually, if I have my counting right), Justin Halpert's Sh*t My Dad Says, the phenomenon is actually funnier if you read the tweets as they drop one by one. Read too many in one go, and they become tedious.

This book has lived in my kitchen for the last couple of years, where I have occasionally picked it up to read a page or two of problems while waiting for the kettle to boil or my tea to finish brewing. It is definitely worth several smiles, a few giggles and a couple of laughs, but only if you take care to read the problems like I did - a few at a time and no more. Too many, and it gets tedious, fast.

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