31 August 2010

Meme: Top Ten Favorite Heroines

Yay! I have finally managed to post a Top Ten Tuesday meme on time...

This was a tough one, but here goes, in no particular order:

My top ten favourite literary heroines:

  • Anne Eliot from Persuasion by Jane Austen. She’s a quiet, uncomplaining and unappreciated but incredibly kind-hearted, patient and loving woman who finally learns that sometimes we need to trust our own feelings and not listen to others. Of all Austen’s heroines she is the one I like the best.
  • Minerva Dobbs from Bet Me by Jennifer Crusie. A woman who doesn’t hesitate to say what she thinks.
  • Anne Shirley from Anne of Green Gables, Anne of Avonlea and Anne of the Island by L.M. Montgomery. I was a bit like her as a girl, which is why I think I like her so much. I don’t like her so much after she marries, which is why I specify in which books I like her best.
  • Miss Marple, from the books by Agatha Christie. She’s a sharp and inquisitive old bat who knows human nature in and out and uses that knowledge for good.
  • Celie from The Color Purple. An incredibly strong and resilient but also human and fallible heroine who survived terrible treatment and came out even stronger in the end.
  • Granny Weatherwax and Nanny Ogg from the Discworld books (Witches sub-series) by Terry Pratchett. I put them in as a unit because they are a team and wouldn’t be much fun without each other’s tempering influences. Granny would never describe herself as a heroine, whereas Nanny would proudly do so but only if it got her a free drink.
  • Susan Sto Helit from the Discworld books (Death sub-series) by Terry Pratchett. Sharply intelligent and brave, resilient and determined to make it on her own merit. Perhaps a little too obsessed with being normal when she clearly isn’t and never will be.
  • Flore Poste from Cold Comfort Farm by Stella Gibbons. Determined, self-assured and accomplished, I would love to have her on my side in any situation, even if she is a bit managing at times.
  • Sophia Stanton-Lacy from The Grand Sophy by Georgette Heyer. An accomploshed and clever heroine who has a solution for everything.
  • Léonie de Saint-Vire from These old Shades by Georgette Heyer. A lovely, loyal, kick-ass spitfire I would love to have for a friend. Married to my favourite bad-boy hero.

4 comments:

Daisy said...

I've just read a short story with Granny and Nanny and loved them! A friend recommended it and it was hilarious, I'll have to read more of Pratchett's books.

danya said...

Haven't read most of these, but Anne Eliot's a great choice! She is totally under-appreciated but in the end she manages to get what she wants :)

George said...

An impressive list of characters! But I notice most of the women characters were created by women writers. I've found most male authors have problems creating credible women characters. The two exceptions (for me) are Thomas Hardy and Norman Mailer with Nicole in THE EXECUTIONER'S SONG.

readerbuzz said...

Interesting. Your list is completely different from mine. I'm happy there are so many great female characters out there!

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