07 June 2013

Friday book list # 8: Cold Comfort Farm by Stella Gibbons


Books and other publications (including poems) mentioned in Cold Comfort Farm by Stella Gibbons, including imaginary works. For further discussion of some of these (and for annotations of other stuff in the book) visit the BookDrum entry for Cold Comfort Farm.

Real:
Novels: 
Did She Love Him? by James Grant
Home Influence by Grace Aguilar
How She Loved Him by Florence Marryat (this should actually be How They Loved Him)
Macaria, or Altars of Sacrifice by A. J. Evans-Wilson 
Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
Persuasion by Jane Austen
Shirley by Charlotte Brontë
Villette by Charlotte Brontë
Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë

Poetry:
'Julian and Maddalo' by Percy Bysshe Shelley
'Adonaïs' (An Elegy on the Death of John Keats, Author of Endymion, Hyperion, etc.) by Percy Bysshe Shelley

Publications:

Imaginary:
Novels: 
The Fulfilment of Martin Hoare by Anthony Pookworthy, A.B.S, L.L.R.

Non-fiction:
The Higher Common Sense and Pensées by the Abbe Fausse-Maigre (these are works of philosophy)
Madame Olga's Dream Book (presumably a book of dream interpretations)
Odour of Sanctity (a history of sanitation)
Victorian Vista (a life of Carlyle) - interestingly, there was later published a book titled Victorian Vista, but about a different subject altogether. I can't but wonder if the author got the idea from Gibbons.

Play:
Manallalive-O! by Brandt Slurb
On Your Toes! 

Publications:
"Haussman-Haffnitz on Brassières" (magazine? thesis? I have no idea)
Milk Producer's Weekly Bulletin and Cowkeeper's Guide
Photo Bits (there was a real magazine with that title, but as it ceased publication in 1914 and Cold Comfort Farm was published in the 1930s, I doubt it's the same magazine, although probably it is of similar nature) 
Internationally Progressive Farmers Guide and Helpmeet

Planned but not yet published (both by Mr. My(er)b(ur)g: 
Scapegoat: A Study of Branwell Brontë (alternative title: Pard-Spirit: A Study of Branwell Brontë)
Virginal

Doubtful:
News of People (presumably a magazine or newspaper). I could not determine whether this was real or not, but the editor of the BookDrum entry for Cold Comfort Farm suggests the title is a parody of the title of the tabloid News of the World.

2 comments:

Deb Nance at Readerbuzz said...

Wow! That's a lot of book (both real and imaginary!) references.

Bibliophile said...

Yes indeed. I am considering reading the obscure Victorian titles at some point. And of course the references to the Brontës set me off on my Brontë project.